Issue Resolution is Everything

Almost everyone with a construction project has issues with their contractor. The tales are often cringeworthy. In some form or another most relate to timeliness and client communication. Basic honesty can be a concern as well.


Sounds a bit like complaints people have with lawyers…


I am in the midst of a construction project on my new house. In contrast to the above, my contractor experience has been awesome. Beth Campbell has been on top of everything from the start. Calls and texts are returned promptly. In fact, more often than not she is the one initiating the contact. The work has been done beautifully. I’ve even liked all her sub-contractors. I really can’t say enough good things. So far, Beth gets an unqualified A in my book.


We are not quite finished with the initial phase of work. It’s still entirely possible that some significant problem could rear its head. It’s an old house, after all. If it does, I am certain Beth will be completely upfront about it and we’ll collaboratively work through the situation. I am confident she will be fair and reasonable.


At this point in the process, Beth’s reservoir of goodwill with me is just huge. She has earned it.


There is a lawyer lesson here. If you are on top of your cases and keep clients informed, you will have happy clients. In and of itself, that’s a good thing. However, where it really pays off is when issues arise. Clients will have faith in you. Just like it is with my contractor, that reservoir of goodwill means clients will be much more likely to give you the benefit of the doubt.


Cases develop problems at times. Things go wrong. Stuff doesn’t turn out as planned. In the vernacular, s*** happens.


There are times all of us need our clients to give us some benefit of the doubt. We’re a lot more likely to get it if we’ve consistently taken care of those clients beforehand.


It’s funny to think of a general contractor being a role model for a trial lawyer. Beth Campbell is exactly that, however.